The Gunnery's Student Newspaper

Two Years After the Deciding Vote, Brexit Moves Forward

By Sam Schreiber ’20

A little over 2 years ago, Britain voted to leave the European Union, which was a move that, at the time, shocked many. With the vote being 51.9% in favor and 48.1% opposed, tensions were exceedingly high.

In the last two years, the progression of Brexit had been slow and uneventful, until recently when British Prime Minister Theresa May announced a new draft deal. Upon announcing the news of this deal to the Chambers of Commerce, she was met with jeers and yelling from politicians all across the aisle.

Public outcry for yet another referendum on Brexit has been very apparent with multiple members of Parliament expressing their concern for May’s deal. The deal was set to be vote on in the commons on December 11, but this was postponed by May after realizing the overwhelming negative feedback to the deal. The vote is now set to take place during the week of January 14, but with huge criticisms coming from all sides it seems more likely than not that the deal will not be approved.

Britain is set to leave the EU on the March 29, 2018. This is on track to happen and will unless another referendum is held surrounding Brexit, something May has continually denied the possibility of. With May’s deal appearing as the last chance for a deal concerning Brexit, the vote this January will be absolutely crucial.

If the deal is not approved, it is likely that Britain will leave the European Union with no deal. This would mean that the British economy would be left to its own devices with tariffs on goods and transportation being treated the same as any other non-union country. However, some have pointed out that the possibility of a no-deal Brexit could be seen as better than the Brexit in May’s deal.

With no clear direction, Britain’s possible exit from the European Union seems unclear to say the least. The biggest indicator of movement will come in January when Parliament will make the hard choice, ultimately determining the future of their country.

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